Home Worship

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the state of emergency in Virginia, and the ban on gatherings with ten or more people, and out of an abundance of caution, we have made the decision to cancel all activities at Resurrection for the foreseeable future. Pastors Linman and Lathrop and our interim music directory, Barbara Verdile, are recording songs and sermons and preparing worship material so that we may all continue to worship and pray together while we are apart, for each other and the needy world.

Every week, we will be posting a home worship bulletin, with songs, prayers, and readings, and providing links to our YouTube channel where you can listen to Pastor Linman's sermon and Barbara's music.

Dear members of God’s family at Resurrection Church,

The readings today narrate “theophanies,” manifestations of the presence and word of God in the midst of human need. If you are able, join the congregation from your home in reading, singing and praying around the presence of Christ amid our world’s need on Sunday, August 9, at 10am.

Worship Service

A pre-recorded worship service, complete with readings, Pastor Linman's sermon, prayers, and music will broadcast at 10am on Sunday, August 9, on our YouTube channel and will be available below:

Worship material for August 9, 2020

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for August 9, 2020:

Music Notes

Hymn of the Day “Eternal Father, Strong to Save” #756
Text: William Whiting (1825-1878) Tune: MELITA, John B. Dykes (1823-1876)

William Whiting wrote the text of this hymn for one of his students who was about to sail to America. It was revised and included in the first edition of Hymns Ancient and Modern (1861) “for those at sea”. This hymn, always paired with the tune MELITA which was written and published with it, has found wide usage as the sailor’s hymn and has been allied to the state almost as much as to the church.

MELITA is the ancient name for the island now known as Malta, where Paul was shipwrecked and found safety.

Musical Meditation: Cantilène, Gabriel Pierné (1863-1937)

Gabriel Pierné has been called the most complete French musician of the late Romantic/early twentieth century era. Pierné’s compositional style can be described as very traditional and classical in form while possessing a modern spirit. He was able to eloquently balance his own personal language with the elements of both discipline and instinct. Evidence of his studies with both Massenet and Franck are very apparent. From Massenet he acquired a sense of melody and lightness, while from Franck he developed a sense of structure and consciousness of art, and an inspiration for religious music. Though much of his music is overshadowed by other French composers from his day, it is because his time was devoted primarily to conducting.

Cantilène is the second of Trois Pieces, Op. 29.

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Dear members of God’s family at Resurrection Church,

Every Sunday is a celebration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ. On this Sunday we read a passage from Isaiah that can remind us of Easter since it is read every year at the Vigil of Easter, calling us once again to feast on God’s free mercy. And then, from Matthew today, we read the story of Jesus feeding a great multitude in the wilderness. In our worldwide wilderness now, join the congregation on Sun- day, August 2, at 10am, gathering again in common prayer around the risen Jesus Christ, the great Breadgiver.

Worship Service

A pre-recorded worship service, complete with readings, Pastor Linman's sermon, prayers, and music will broadcast at 10am on Sunday, August 2, on our YouTube channel and will be available below:

Worship material for August 2, 2020

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for August 2, 2020:

Music Notes

Hymn of the Day “O Jesus, Joy of Loving Hearts” #658
Text: atr. Bernard of Clairvaux, (1091-11563), Ray Palmer , tr.(1808-1887)
Tune: WALTON, W. Gardiner (1770-1853)

Ray Palmer’s translation of several verses from “Jesu, dulcedo cordium” was published in 1858. In 19th century Protestant America, it was unusual to translate a Latin hymn text. He was pastor of a church in Maine and upstate New York and is probably best known for penning the verses, “My faith looks up to thee.”

William Gardiner wrote about music, composing, and editing. Having met Joseph Haydn and Ludwig van Beethoven on his business travels, Gardiner then proceeded to help popularize their compositions, especially Beethoven's, in England. He recorded his memories of various musicians in Music and Friends. In the first two volumes of Sacred Melodies (1812, 1815), Gardiner turned melodies from composers such as Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven into hymn tunes in an attempt to rejuvenate the singing of psalms. WALTON, aka BEETHOVEN, may have roots somewhere in Beethoven’s music, but Gardiner could not say where. In any case, his work became an important model for American editors, and hymnbook editors often turned to Gardiner as a source of tunes derived from classical music.

Musical Meditation Prelude on “Wareham”, Healy Willan (1880-1968)

Healey Willan was an Anglo-Canadian organist and composer, best known for his church music compositions. I found this quote he used to describe himself which suggests he had quite a sense of humor: "English by birth; Canadian by adoption; Irish by extraction; Scotch by absorption." Willan was able to make his livelihood as a composer, an encouraging detail not lost on the young Canadian musicians who followed him.

This organ piece comes from Willan’s collection of Choral Preludes published in 1957 and are based on well-known hymn or choral tunes. Many have the same basic structure: a short introduction followed by the phrases of the tune alternating with interludes. All offer a richness of harmonic beauty typical of Willan’s compositions.

The Musical Reflection, "WAREHAM" is a setting of today’s second hymn, #729, “The Church of Christ, in Every Age”. The tune was composed by William Knapp and named for his birthplace. The tune is easy to sing because of its almost continuous stepwise motion and smooth melodic contour and is most of found paired with this text.

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Dear members of God’s family at Resurrection Church,

For the third Sunday in a row we read from Matthew’s collection of Jesus’ parables. Only, this Sunday the images are more surprising yet, full of God’s wisdom, like that given to Solomon, full of the love of Christ from which we can never be separated, as St. Paul says. On Sunday, July 26, if you can, join the congregation in praying together at 10 am.

Worship Service

A pre-recorded worship service, complete with readings, Pastor Linman's sermon, prayers, and music will broadcast at 10am on Sunday, July 26 on our YouTube channel and will be available below:

Worship material for July 26, 2020

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for July 26, 2020:

Music Notes

Hymn of the Day: “Jesus, Priceless Treasure,” #775
Text: Johann Franck (1618-1677)
Tune: JESU, MEINE FREUDE, Johann Crüger (1598-1662)

The original German text “Jesu, meine Freude” by Johann Franck first appeared in Johann Crüger's Praxis Pietatis Melica (1653) in six long stanzas. The text was modeled in part after a love song found in Heinrich Albert's Arein (1641), "Flora, meine Freude, meiner Seele Weide.” Catherine Winkworth translated the text into English and published it in her Chorale Book for England (1863). Our version includes the original stanzas 1, 2, and 6. Much loved by Christians from various traditions, “Jesus, Priceless Treasure” is one of the finest examples of German piety in a devotional hymn. The intensity of emotional expression found here provides a suitable counter-balance to the cerebral character of much Reformed worship.

Inspired by Jesus' parables of the great treasure and fine pearl (Matt. 13:44-46) and other New Testament references to the metaphor "treasure," this text is strongly Christocentric. Stanza 1 confesses with mystical ecstasy that Christ is the source of purest pleasure (a bold affirmation that counters the hedonism of this world). Stanza 2 expands the metaphor: Christ our treasure is also our fortress, our defense and protector from the "sin and hell" that would "assail" us. And stanza 4 affirms that, despite the fears and sorrow we must bear, Jesus remains our greatest treasure and source of profound joy.

Johann Crüger is known as a German composer of well-known hymns. He was also the editor of the most widely used Lutheran hymnal of the 17th century, Praxis pietatis melica, which is considered one of the most important collections of German hymnody in the seventeenth century. It was reprinted forty-four times in the following hundred years. He wrote music instruction manuals and tirelessly promoted congregational singing. With his tunes he often included elaborate accom­paniment for various instruments. Crüger's hymn collection, Neues vollkomliches Gesangbuch (1640), was one of the first hymnals to include figured bass accompaniment (musical shorthand) with the chorale melody rather than full harmonization written out. It included eighteen of Crüger's tunes.

Musical Meditation: “Soul, Adorn Thyself with Gladness”, Aaron David Miller (b.1972)

The original of the beautifully ornamented melody of today’s Musical Reflection represents a second collaboration of music and text by Johann Crüger and Johann Franck. Johann Crüger composed SCHMÜCKE DICH (Deck Thyself, My Soul) and first published the tune as a setting for the first stanza of the SCHMÜCKE DICH text by Johann Franck. The tune name is the incipit of the original German text. Johann S. Bach used this tune in his Cantata 180; he and many other composers have written organ preludes on the melody.

Aaron David Miller is noted for his highly imaginative and creative style, found in his performances, improvisations and compositions. He serves as the Director of Music and Organist at House of Hope Presbyterian Church in St. Paul, Minnesota and maintains an active recital schedule. He is a forensic musicologist for Donato Music in Scarsdale, NY.

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Dear members of God’s family at Resurrection Church,

This Sunday we once again read from the Third Discourse of Matthew, Matthew’s collection of the parables of Jesus. The Gospel for this Sunday is a parable found only in Matthew: the story of the wheat and the weeds. The parable calls for us to leave judgement to God and to instead rely on God’s mercy and patience. If you are able, join the congregation at 10am on Sunday to pray and to hear the word of that mercy.

Worship Service

A pre-recorded worship service, complete with readings, Pastor Linman's sermon, prayers, and music will broadcast at 10am on Sunday, July 19 on our YouTube channel and will be available below:

Worship material for July 19, 2020

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for July 19, 2020:

Music Notes

Hymn of the Day: “We Plow the Fields and Scatter”, #681
Text: Matthias Claudius (1740-1815)
Tune: Wir Pflugen, Johann A. Schulz, (1747-1800)

This text was not written as a hymn, nor was it stimulated by specific biblical passages. It was first published in a newspaper as an idyllic portrayal of country life and later the refrain and certain stanzas were gathered to form this hymn text. In 1861 Jane M. Campbell translated them into English.

The tune, also known as CLAUDIUS, first appeared with another text in a volume of melodies for public schools.

Musical Reflection: “All Glory Be to God on High”, Craig Phillips (b. 1961)

California based, and an Oklahoma native, Craig Phillips is a distinguished and popular American composer and organist, and Director of Music at All Saints’ Church, Beverly Hills, CA.

The tune is the work of the cantor, pastor and teacher Nikolaus Decius (1485-1546). His source was a 10th century chant setting of the Gloria in excelsis Deo.

Craig Phillips‘ harmonic language is a melting pot of many varied styles and often his rhythmic settings garner attention for their energy, use of rhythm and drive. In this setting he seeks to reflect the rather exuberant text in a manner both introspective and uplifting.

Ms. Angie has a new message for the children at RELC! Click below to view:

Dear members of God’s family at Resurrection Church,

We begin now to read for three Sundays in a row the third of the Great Discourses of Matthew: the Parables of Jesus. This Sunday the Gospel is the Parable of the Sower. Together with your congregation, if you are able, join in prayer at 10am on Sunday, using one of the many available ways, to let the seed of the word of God fall into your life again.

Worship Service

A pre-recorded worship service, complete with readings, Pastor Linman's sermon, prayers, and music will broadcast at 10am on Sunday, July 12 on our YouTube channel and will be available below:

Worship material for July 12, 2020

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for July 12, 2020:

Music Notes

Hymn of the Day: “Almighty God, Your Word is Cast”, #516
Text: John Cawood (1775-1852)
Tune: St. Flavian, English folk tune

Almighty God, Thy word is cast. J. Cawood. [After Sermon.] Written about 1815 in 5 stanzas of 4 lines, and designated for use "After a Sermon". The text is stimulated by Jesus’ parable of the sower. It was reprinted in 1825 and from that date it has grown in importance as a congregational hymn, and its use has become extensive in all English-speaking countries. He published several prose works, but no volume of hymns or poems. His son says, "My father composed about thirteen hymns, which have one by one got into print, though never published by himself, or any one representing him.”

ST. FLAVIAN is an example of an English psalm tune that, like many Genevan Psalter tunes and German chorales, had its original rhythms smoothed out. It is an English tune that has been happily attached to numerous texts.

Choir Anthem: Go Forth Into the World in Peace
Paul Sjolund (b.1935)

Paul Sjolund is a leading composer of American church and choral music. The range of his style includes a wide spectrum of majestic anthems, fanfares and festival hymns, poignant children's music, and exhilarating range of spirituals and folksongs.

Go forth into the world in peace. Be of good courage, hold fast to that which is good, Render to no one evil for evil.

Go forth into the world in love: Strengthen the faint-hearted, support the weak, Help the afflicted, honor all people: love and serve the Lord.

Rejoicing in the power of the Holy Spirit, go forth into the world in peace.

Musical Reflection: Gift of Finest Wheat
Ron Schmoltze (b. 1936)

Robert E. Kreutz (1922-1996) carefully crafted the tune GIFT OF FINEST WHEAT, or BICENTENNIAL, in 1976 and it is faithfully represented in this organ setting. Though the meter changes frequently, the melody flows very naturally, with the changing meters unified by melodic and rhythmic motifs.

Ron Schmoltze is a church musician working in the San Francisco Bay area.

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Dear members of God’s family at Resurrection Church,

The Gospel today is a beloved passage, unique to Matthew. Jesus speaks, as the very presence of the ancient Wisdom of God, offering rest to those who “are weary and carrying heavy burdens.” In this hard time, we may come to this deep rest to- gether as we encounter Christ in the scripture and as we pray. If you are able, join the congregation, using one of the many ways available, at 10am on Sunday, July 5.

Worship Service Broadcast

A pre-recorded worship service, complete with readings, Pastor Linman's sermon, prayers, and music will broadcast at 10am on Sunday, July 5 on our YouTube channel and will be available below:

Worship material for July 5, 2020

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for July 5, 2020:

Music Notes

Hymn of the Day “I Heard the Voice of Jesus Say”, #611
Text: Horacius Bonar (1808-1889)
Tune: Kingsfold, English folk tune

Dr. Bonar's family has had representatives among the clergy of the Church of Scotland during two centuries and more. Horatius Bonar was ordained to the ministry and served as pastor at Kelso. In 1843, he joined the Free Church of Scotland. His reputation as a religious writer was first gained on the publication of the "Kelso Tracts," of which he was the author. He has also written many other prose works, some of which have had a very large circulation. Nor is he less favorably known as a religious poet and hymn-writer. The three series of "Hymns of Faith and Hope," have passed through several editions.

Dr. Bonar's poems—-including many beautiful lyrics, several psalm versions, and translations from the Greek and Latin, a large number of hymns, and a long meditative poem—-are very numerous. With Dr. Bonar's poetical writings great difficulty has been encountered by the historian and annotator because of his absolute indifference to dates and details. It was enough for him that he had written, and that the Church of Christ approved and gladly used what, out of the fulness of his heart, he had given her.

In Great Britain and America nearly 100 of Dr. Bonar's hymn texts are in common use. They are found in almost all modern hymnals.

Thought by some scholars to date back to the Middle Ages, the tune KINGSFOLD is a folk tune set to a variety of texts in England and Ireland. It was published in English Country Songs (1893). After having heard the tune in Kingsfold, Sussex, England (thus its name), Ralph Vaughan Williams introduced it as a hymn tune in The English Hymnal (1906) as a setting for Horatius Bonar's "I Heard the Voice of Jesus Say".

Musical Reflection: God Himself Is With Us, David Cherwein (1957)

David Cherwien, Artistic Director of the National Lutheran Choir, is a nationally known conductor, composer, and organist. Recognized for his contributions to the field of church music and liturgy, he is in demand as a clinician and hymn festival leader across the country.

In applying his vibrant, musical imagination to this calm and serene hymn setting, David Cherwien has composed an enchanting piece filled with hushed harmonies which fall gently on the ear. Enjoy!

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Dear members of God’s family at Resurrection Church,

We finish reading from the second great discourse of Matthew today, the mission instructions given to the disciples and given still to us. We are exhorted to wel- come those who come to our communities, faithfully speaking the word of God, and we are urged to welcome with a cup of cold water the littlest and most vulner- able of people. On this “cup of cold water Sunday,” join together with your con- gregation — at 10 am, if you are able — to hear the word of God and pray in your own home. These materials offer you many ways to do that. Then consider how you may offer that cup of water to others, even when “socially distanced.”

Worship Service Broadcast

A pre-recorded worship service, complete with readings, Pastor Linman's sermon, prayers, and music will broadcast at 10am on Sunday, June 28 on our YouTube channel and will be available below:

Worship material for June 28, 2020

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for June 28, 2020:

Music Notes

Hymn of the Day: “Lord of Glory, You Have Bought Us”, #707
Text: Eliza S. Alderson (1818-1889)
Tune: HYFRYDOL, Rowland H. Pritchard (1811-1887)

Eliza S. Alderson wrote this text about tithing, sent it to the committee working on an addition to Hymns Ancient and Modern (1861) and requested that, if it were chosen, her brother John B. Dykes would be asked to write a tune for it. It was chosen, and he wrote the pleasant and not memorable CHARITAS.

Rowland H. Pritchard was a textile worker and an amateur musician. He had a good singing voice and was appointed precentor in Graienyn. Many of his tunes were published in Welsh periodicals. He composed this most loved Welsh tune when he was only nineteen. It was published with about forty of his other tunes in his children's hymnal Cyfaill y Cantorion (The Singers' Friend) in 1844. HYFRYDOL means delightful, beautiful, sweet, melodious, etc. The “H” in the tune name is pronounced, both the ‘y’s are sounded like the ‘u’ in ‘nut’ and the ‘f’ is voiced like ‘v’. This tune can be found published with at least 91 different texts. This is probably because HYFRYDOL is not only a tune that is quite friendly to congregations but one that accommodates many texts very well.

Musical Reflection: Give Me Jesus, Richard Billingham (1934)

Richard Billington worked for many years as Associate Professor of Music at the University of Illinois and Organist at the First Methodist Church, Chicago. Give Me Jesus is a fairly old hymn, originating as an African-American spiritual written during the time of slavery in the Untied States. It is currently published in 22 hymnals.

Ms. Angie has a new Children's Message. Click below to view!

Dear members of God’s family at Resurrection Church,

On this Sunday we continue to read from the second great discourse in the Gospel according to Matthew, the Mission Instruction to the Disciples in Matthew 10. Those instructions come to us now, both seriously challenging us and profoundly comforting us. Join with the congregation on this Third Sunday after Pentecost — at 10am, if you are able — to hear this challenge and comfort and to pray together. Then turn to the new week refreshed in your calling as witness to God’s mercy and love..

Worship Service Broadcast

A pre-recorded worship service, complete with readings, Pastor Linman's sermon, prayers, and music will broadcast at 10am on Sunday, June 21 on our YouTube channel and will be available below:

Worship material for June 21, 2020

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for June 21, 2020:

Music Notes

Hymn of the Day: “Let Us Ever Walk With Jesus”, #802
Text: Sigismund von Birken (1626-1681)
Tune: LASSET UNS MIT JESU ZIEHEN, Georg G. Boltze (fl. 1750-1789)

Sigismund von Birken wrote this hymn for Passiontide, based on Luke 18:31-34, where Jesus turns his attention to Jerusalem. It was published in 1652. In 1910 it was translated into English and appeared in the ELW 1912. Von Birken wrote 52 hymns in all, but he was not able to shake off the artificial influences of the time, and not many of them have retained a place in German common use. Three have been translated into English.

In addition to his writing this hymn tune, we know Georg G. Boltze was a cantor and school teacher at an orphanage in Potsdam in 1750 and was still living in 1789. He wrote LASSET UNS MIT JESU ZIEHEN in 1788 for a different text. However, since the English translation of the “Let Us Ever Walk With Jesus,” tune and text have been paired.

Musical Reflection: Aire on “Bridegroom”, Mary Beth Bennett (1954)

Written in 1968, BRIDEGROOM is Peter Cutts’ best-known tune and appears in almost all major hymnals. Peter Cutts composed over 130 hymn tunes, some 90 of which appear in print throughout the English-speaking world, Bridegroom is most often found set to Carl Daw’s text, “Like the murmur of the dove’s song.”

Mary Beth Bennett is a recognized performer, improviser and composer living in historic Richmond, Virginia. Having held positions in Washington, D.C. at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, and as Ceremonial Organ for the U. S. Government, she currently serves on the adjunct music faculty of the University of Richmond, and is Director of Music Ministries at Grace Covenant Presbyterian Church in Gloucester, Virginia.

Ms. Angie has a new message for the children of RELC! Click below to view:

Dear members of the family of God at Resurrection Church,

With this Sunday we begin again to read through the Gospel according to Matthew, picking up where we left off just before Lent began. We last were reading from the first great discourse of Matthew, Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount. Now we start with the second great discourse: Jesus’ Mission Instructions to the disciples. Even — perhaps especially — in this shutdown time, those instructions come to us, to our church. There are many ways you can join in our church’s common prayer at home: praying these materials yourself or supporting that prayer with some or all of our videos. In whatever way you choose, try to join us at 10am on Sunday, June 14. Then be sent into your week with our common mission.

Worship Service Broadcast

A pre-recorded worship service, complete with readings, Pastor Linman's sermon, prayers, and music will broadcast at 10am on Sunday, June 14 on our YouTube channel and will be available below:

Worship material for June 14, 2020

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for June 7, 2020:

Music Notes

Hymn of the Day: “The Son of God, Our Christ”, #584
Text: Edward M. Blumenfeld (1927)
Tune: SURSUM CORDA, Alfred M. Smith, (1879-1971)

The text for this hymn was written in 1957 by Edward M. Blumenfeld in response to a search sponsored by the Hymn Society of America for hymn texts written by people under 30 years of age. He began writing verse when his Grade 3 class was directed to copy from the blackboard a poem for the Mother's Day cards the students were making; having a twin brother in the class, he wrote a verse of his own to spare his mother two identical cards. As a minister, he wrote verses to illustrate his sermons and to comprise a column in the local newspaper. Not being musical, he found the appearance of his lyrics in various hymnbooks mystifying but gratifying.

The tune, Sursum Corda, submitted anonymously for consideration to the committee that prepared The Hymnal 1940, was originally composed for the eucharistic hymn, “Lift up your hearts.” Alfred Morton Smith eventually surfaced as the composer of this tune named for the Latin of the original text, “Sursum Corda.” He is known to have contributed 2 other tunes to the hymn tune literature. “Sursum Corda” is the most popular and is now paired with a wide variety of texts.

Musical Reflection: Carlisle, Charles Callahan

The hymn tune “Carlisle” was written by Charles Lockhart (1745-1815). He was first organist of the Lock Hospital, and was for some years associated with Martin Madan in the musical arrangements there. Though blind from infancy, Lockhart had a distinct musical gift, and was especially known for training children’s choirs. He published a set of hymn tunes about 1810 of which this was one. “Carlisle” was his most popular hymn tune and it can be found in 92 hymnals.

Charles Callahan is a well-known composer, organist, choral conductor, pianist and teacher. He is a graduate of The Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia, Pa., and The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC. The serene and tranquil nature found in the “Carlisle” tune pairs well with the gentle, confident lyricism of Callahan’s compositions.

Ms. Angie has a new message for the children of RELC. Click below to view!

Dear members of God’s family at Resurrection Church,

This Sunday is one week after Pentecost, thus one week after the end of Easter’s 50 days. We keep this festival day, called Trinity Sunday, as a summary of all the grace, love and communion that was given to us in Lent and Easter, and we do this before we begin again to keep the series of standard Sundays through the year. We have been baptized in the rich name of the Triune God. Although we cannot meet in person now to greet each other in that name, we can greet each other from afar by praying together. If you are able, join your fellow members of the Resurrection family by using these worship materials at 10 am on Sunday, June 7.

Worship material for the Holy Trinity, June 7, 2020

And don't forget: 

Spark Family Sunday SchoolSpark Family Sunday School has lessons for today about "Creation"

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for June 7, 2020:

Music Notes

Hymn of the Day: “Rise, Shine, You People”, #665
Text: Ronald A. Klug (1939)
Tune: WOJTKIEWIECZ, Dale Wood, (1934-2003)

Starting with this text from Isaiah 60:1: “Arise, shine for your light has come, and the glory of the Lord has risen upon you,” Ronald A. Klug wrote this text originally purposed for the Epiphany season. Thankfully it has come to embrace an even wider purpose to “hurl your songs and prayers against the darkness.”

In addition to consulting, conducting and writing articles, Dale Wood composed over 300 musical compositions, from hymn tunes to a music drama with orchestra. When he wrote the tune for Klug’s text he gave it his family name, Wojtkiewiecz, which was simplified when the family came to the United States.

Musical Reflection: St. Patrick’s Breastplate
Rebecca Groom Te Velde (1956)

Saint Patrick's Breastplate, a prayer of protection, also known as The Deer's Cry, The Lorica of Saint Patrick or Saint Patrick's Hymn, is a lorica. In the Christian monastic tradition, a lorica is a prayer recited for protection in which the petitioner invokes all the power of God as a safeguard against evil in its many forms. The Latin word lōrīca originally meant "armor" or "breastplate." Both meanings come together in the practice of placing verbal inscriptions on the shields or armorial trappings of knights, who might recite them before going into battle. The original Old Irish lyrics of this hymn were traditionally attributed to Saint Patrick during his Irish ministry in the 5th century. In 1889 it was adapted into the hymn I Bind Unto Myself Today.

Rebecca Groom Te Velde is a third-generation professional organist, following both parents and her grandfather. In 1991 she assumed her present position as organist of First Presbyterian Church in Stillwater, OK. She is an active performer, composer, clinician, and adjunct instructor of music at Oklahoma State University.

Ms. Angie has a new message for the children of RELC. Click below to view!

Dear members of God’s family at Resurrection Church,

Easter is 50 days long and the Day of Pentecost is the 50th day. Easter has 8 Sun- days and the Day of Pentecost is the 8th Sunday, the last day of the feast. The Spirit of God, celebrated on this day, takes all the meaning of Easter, all the life and hope God gives us, the very presence of Jesus Christ alive, and pours this love into our hearts. This gift is true, even when we are sheltering at home, away from our usual gathering. The Spirit of God, the Spirit of the risen Christ, unites us. If you are able, join your fellow members of this one Body in prayer at home at 10am on May 31.

Alleluia Christ is risen!

Worship material for the Day of Pentecost, May 31, 2020

And don't forget:

 

Spark Family Sunday SchoolSpark Family Sunday School has lessons for today about "The Holy Spirit"

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for May 31, 2020:

Music Notes

Musical Reflection: Veni Creator Spiritus, James Biery (1956).

"Veni Creator Spiritus" ("Come Creator Spirit") is a hymn believed to have been written by Rabanus Maurus in the 9th century. When the original Latin text is used, it is normally sung in Gregorian chant. It has been translated into several languages, often as a hymn for Pentecost.

James Biery is an American organist, composer and conductor who is Minister of Music at Grosse Pointe Memorial Church (Presbyterian) in Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan, where he directs the choirs, plays the 66-rank Klais organ and oversees the music program of the church. Prior to this appointment Biery was music director for Cathedrals in St. Paul, Minnesota and Hartford, Connecticut.

Hymn of the Day: “O Spirit of Life”, #405
Text: Johann Niedling (1602-1668)
Tune: O HEILIGER GEIST, Köln (1623), rar. J. S. Bach (1685-1750)

This German text is attributed to Johann Niedling of whom little is known. It was translated by John Mattes (1876-1948) early in the 20th century. A litany-like refrain brackets all th stanzas. They begin by remembering the Spirit’s action and relationship to the Trinity, then ask for increase in faith, love and light.

The composer of the tune known as “O Heiliger Geist” is unknown. It’s first known printing was in 1623. J. S. Bach harmonized it in 1736.

Choir Anthen: The Lone Wild Bird, David N. Johnson, arr. (1922-1987)
Text: Henry Richard McFayden (1877-1964)

A little volume of David N. Johnson’s entitled Twelve Folksongs and Spirituals (1968) seems to have served several purposes in the evolution of this text. First, he rescued this little jewel from relative hymnological oblivion; second, he paired it quite successfully with the haunting tune PROSPECT from the famous American tunebook, The Sacred Harp (1844); and lastly, he made a few alternations to the text including the substitution of “bird” for “fowl” in the incipit or opening line of the poem.

The text was written for a hymn-writing contest sponsored by the Homiletic and Pastoral Review while Henry Richard McFadyen was serving the Nashville Presbytery. The hymn was published in 1927 and included in The [Presbyterian] Hymnal (1933) with the original first line, “The lone, wild fowl.”

McFadyen’s original two stanzas follow with Johnson’s alterations in brackets:

The lone, wild fowl [bird] in lofty flight
is still with thee, nor leaves thy sight.
And I am thine! I rest in thee,
Great Spirit, come and rest in me.

The ends of earth are in thy hand,
the sea's dark deep and no man's [far off] land.
And I am thine! I rest in thee,
Great Spirit, come, and rest in me.

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