Worship

Ms. Angie has a new message for the children of RELC. Click below to view!

Dear members of God’s family at Resurrection Church,

The Seventh Sunday of Easter always invites us to read from the great prayer of Jesus in John 17, the prayer in which Jesus prays that the people of the church may be one. And this Sunday in this year also invites us to read about the disciples, men and women, being together in the house in prayer. Join the unity of the church again this Sunday as you pray in your house, if it is possible for you, at 10 am on May 24.

Alleluia Christ is risen!

Worship material for May 24, 2020

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for May 24, 2020:

Music Notes

Musical Reflection: "Gelobt sei Gott"
John Leavitt (1956)

Melchior Vulpius (1570-1615) composed this tune as a setting for Michael Weisse's text Gelobt sei Gott in höchsten Thron. In 1609 tune and text were published together in Vulpius's Ein Schon Geistlich Gesangbuch but because the text dates from the early sixteenth century, some scholars think the tune may have older roots.

In this setting by John Leavitt the excitement generated by tune and text is well portrayed with repetitive motives and ornamental figures, a recognizable element of his compositional style. A composer, performer, and clinician for church and school music literature, Leavitt continues to teach, lecture, and guest conduct numerous workshops, festivals, and symposia.

Hymn of the Day: “Rise, O Son of Righteousness”, #657
Text: Christian David, Christian Gottlob Barth, Johann Christian Nehring
Tune: SONNE DER GERECHTIGKEIT

This is a German hymn text from three authors. Stanza 1 is by Christian David (1892-1751), stanzas 2 and 4 are by Christian Gottlob Barth (1799-1862) and stanzas 3 and 5 are by Johann Christian Nehring (1671-1736). Frank Stolt translated and paraphrased it in 2002 and it was published in 2003. SONNE DER GERECHTIGKEIT is a 15th century folksong from the Bohemian Brethren tradition.

Dear members of the family of God,

On this the 40th day of Easter we read the passages in the Gospel according to Luke and in the Acts of the Apostles about Jesus’ ascension, and so we keep Ascension Day. In this time of lock- down and distance, this day can be of enormous comfort. Jesus has not gone away. He has gone to the right hand of God so that he might fill all things. He has come nearer, present for us in the scriptures he has opened and the Spirit he has poured out. If you are able, pray this prayers at 7:30pm on Thursday, May 21.

It is still Easter. Christ has risen! God is among us!

Worship material for May 21, 2020

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for May 21, 2020:

Music Notes

Musical Reflection: Chorale and One Variation from Sonata #6
Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847)

The Organ Sonata #6 in D minor (1845) demonstrates Mendelssohn’s consummate craftsmanship and mastery of organ texture in a set of variations upon the Lutheran Bach chorale Vater unser im Himmelreich (BWV416). Following a five-part harmonization of the Chorale, which pervades the sonata as a whole, Mendelssohn presents four variations of increasing brilliance before a restatement of the Chorale. Here I am playing the 3rd variation. Mendelssohn’s Organ Sonatas revitalised the then-moribund European organ tradition, spurred English organ-builders to new heights, and, through his particular blend of chorale, counterpoint and domestic spirituality, substantially augmented the organ repertoire for the first time since Bach.

Hymn of the Day: “Thine the Amen”, #826
Text: Herbert F. Brokering (1926) Tune: THINE, Carl F. Schalk (1929)

During a 2 week retreat at Holden Village in Washington State, Herbert Brokering wrote a text daily reflecting on the morning’s Bible study, and Carl Schalk, who was the composer for Brokering’s hymns, set it to music. It was a tough schedule, as both text and music had to be at the print shop by 3PM as the new hymn was sung the following morning, reviewing the previous day’s study. THINE was the 10th hymn in the series.

Ms. Angie has a new message for the children of RELC. Click below to view!

Dear members of God’s family at Resurrection church,

We are at the Sixth Sunday of Easter. And this Sunday comes to us as a downpay- ment on Pentecost. Through the death and resurrection of Jesus, the Spirit of God is poured out on us, helping us to know, no matter where we are, the nearness of God. Join together to read these texts, pray these prayers, read or listen to the ser- mon of our Pastor, and sing with our Musician at 10am on Sunday, May 17. We are not orphans; in the word and by the Spirit Christ comes to us, gathering us into the love of his Father. The Holy Trinity holds us. This is the hope of which we are called to gently give account in this needy time.

Christ is risen! Alleluia 

Worship material for May 17, 2020

And don't forget:

Spark Family Sunday SchoolSpark Family Sunday School has lessons for today about "The Promise of the Holy Spirit"

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for May 17, 2020:

Music Notes

Hymn of the Day: “Now the Green Blade Rises”, #379
Text: John MacLeod Campbell Crum (1872-1958)
Tune: NOEL NOUVELET, French Carol

Many of us know this French carol tune as a Christmas carol. But the Easter text was written to this specific tune, which goes back at least to the late 15th century and may derive from one of the plainchants for “Ave maris stella.” The text begins with the imagery of the green blade of the new plant and continues throughout the hymn.

Musical Reflection: "Come Down O Love Divine"
Mark Sedio (1954)

Mark Sedio currently serves as Cantor at Central Lutheran Church in Minneapolis where his responsibilities are varied: organist, choirmaster, resident composer, worship planner and educator. He is also on the music staff of Luther Seminary in St. Paul. Sedio has served as a clinician and lecturer in the areas of worship, liturgy, adult and children's choirs, hymnody and psalmody, and cross-culture music.

Choir Anthem: "Christ the Lord Is Risen Again!"
Anthony Foster (1926- 2012)

Anthony Foster, a British church musician, organist and composer, wrote this Easter anthem based on the hymn text by Michael Weisse (1480-1534) who was a pastor among the Bohemian Brethren, and a contemporary of Martin Luther. The original text was translated into English by Catherine Wentworth.

Christ the Lord is risen again;
Christ has broken every chain!
Hark, the angels shout for joy,
Singing evermore on high: Alleluia.

He who gave for us his life,
Who for us endured the strife,
Is our Paschal Lamb today.
We, too, sing for joy and say: Alleluia.

He who bore all pain and loss
Comfortless upon the cross,
Lives in glory now on high,
Pleads for us and hears our cry: Alleluia.

You, our Paschal Lamb indeed,
Christ, today your people feed,
Take our sins and guilt away,
That we all may sing for joy: Alleluia

Ms. Angie has a new message for the children of RELC. Click here to view!

Dear members of God’s family,

We continue to pray in our homes, but pray together. In these final Sundays of Easter, we hear from the “Farewell Discourse” in chapters 14-17 of the Gospel according to John. That discourse is the unique way the Fourth Gospel tells the meaning of the death and resurrection of Jesus. And that meaning reaches out to us today, into our homes, making us together into God’s people, God’s witnesses. If you are able, read these scriptures and pray these prayers together with your fellow members at Resurrection church at 10am on Sunday, May 10.

Christ is risen! Alleluia! 

Worship material for May 10, 2020

And don't forget:

Spark Family Sunday SchoolSpark Family Sunday School has lessons for today about "God's House"

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for May 10, 2020:

 

Music Notes

Musical Reflection
Gaudeamus Paritur, Robert Buckley Farlee (1950)

So, the postlude, set by Robert Buckley Farlee, is based on the hymn tune Gaudeamus Paritur, by Johann Roh (1487-1547), and here we speak of pseudonyms. Johann Roh was a native of Bohemia. Roh was his name in Bohemian, but when he wrote in Latin he called himself Cornu, and in German, Horn.

Robert Buckley Farlee, who has not altered or changed his name, is Associate Pastor and Director of Music at Christ Lutheran Church in Minneapolis. He was deeply involved in the publication of Evangelical Lutheran Worship.

Hymn of the Day: “Christ Is Alive! Let Christians Sing”, #389
Text: Brian Wren (1936) Tune: TRURO

TRURO is an anonymous tune, first published in Thomas Williams's Psalmodia Evangelica, (1789) as a setting for Isaac Watts' "Now to the Lord a noble song." Virtually nothing is known about this eighteenth-century British editor of the two-volume Psalmodia Evangelica, a collection of three-part psalm and hymn tunes for "Churches, Chapels, and Dissenting Meetings in England, Scotland, and Ireland." The tune is named for an ancient city in Cornwall, England, famous for its cathedral and for its pottery.

Brian A. Wren wrote the text during April of 1968. Wren writes:

It was written for Easter Sunday, two weeks after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. I could not let Easter go by without speaking of this tragic event which was on all our minds. . . . The hymn tries to see God's love winning over tragedy and suffering in the world. . . . There is tension and tragedy in these words, not just Easter rejoicing.”

"Christ Is Alive" is a joyful celebration of Christ's resurrection (st. 1) and of his personal rule in a human world in which pain, war, and injustice abound (st. 2-4). Christ’s transcendent and immanent reign is empowered by the Holy Spirit and will ultimately bring about a new creation (st. 5).

First published in the British supplement New Church Praise (1975), the text was revised by Wren several times - in 1978, 1989 and 1993. The text found in the ELW is the most recent version.

Ms. Angie has a new message for the children of RELC. Click here to view!

Dear members of God’s family at Resurrection Church,

Unlike the community in our First Reading today, we cannot share direct fellowship nor the “breaking of bread” this Sunday. But we can share the “apostles’ teaching”—which is the scripture—and we can share the prayers! If you are able, do read and pray these materials together with our whole community on Sunday, May 3, at 10am. If you wish, Pastor Linman’s sermon is available to be read or to be watched. Music from Barbara Verdile is also available to listen to, to pray by, or to help you sing. All of these can be found on the church website, in the RELC news email you received, or on the YouTube channel you can access through any of those means. Some of you receive these materials by post. If you do not but would like to so receive them, do contact our church administrator, Monika Carney, at the church office. Easter continues. Christ is risen. Alleluia!

 

Worship material for May 3, 2020

And don't forget:

Spark Family Sunday SchoolSpark Family Sunday School has lessons for today about "Early Believers"

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for May 3, 2020:

  • Barbara Verdile: Psalm 23:1-6
  • Pastor Linman's recorded sermon
  • Hymn #782, "My Shepherd, You Supply My Need"
  • Choral Piece, "Loving Shepherd" with Elizabeth Schoen and Barbara Verdile (flutes) and Lee Ann Konstantinov (soprano)
  • Hymn #780, "Shepherd Me, O God"
  • Organ Piece, "The King of Love My Shepherd Is" from St. Columba by Kenneth Leighton

Dear members of God’s family at Resurrection Church,

Again this Sunday we are at home, sequestered away from others, not only that we might be safe but especially that other vulnerable people might be protected. But the Gospel for this day tells of Christ coming to such a home and being recognized there as risen. If you are able, join with all of us of Resurrection Church by pray- ing together with these materials and with the sermon and the music available on- line. We can do so in common at 10 am on Sunday, April 26.

 

Worship material for April 26, 2020

And don't forget:

Spark Family Sunday SchoolSpark Family Sunday School has lessons for today about "The Road to Emmaus"

The following have been posted to YouTube; here is the YouTube Playlist for April 26, 2020: